Nocturnal Lives

Musings from the mind of Amanda S. Green – Mother, Writer, Possessed by Cats

Tag: Pat Patterson

A Wonderful Nocturnal Rebellion Review

(Like so many of you, I’m still processing what happened in Las Vegas last night. Once I have, and once I know more facts, I’ll probably blog about it. In the meantime, I have to share this wonderful review of Nocturnal Rebellion. The reviewer is Pat Patterson and you can find his blog here.)

Nocturnal Rebellion, by Amanda S Green

For those of you who come here in order to read my latest philosophical or theological struggles,  I warn in advance: this is a book review about a police detective who is also a reserve Marine officer who can shape-shift into a jaguar. Don’t anticipate passion and depth, beyond that found in story dealing with the line-of-duty loss of fellow police officers.

This book was released on August 15, 2017, and with great anticipation, I obtained my copy through the Kindle Unlimited program on August 17. I hear you mutter, ‘but this is OCTOBER 2! What happened?’

Well what happened was a trip to the hospital for a small bowel obstruction, which resolved well. That was followed by multiple trips to the dentist, for major dental surgery, and a few major family health issues, and, well, just LOTS of things. My output of reviews and blog posts suffered. It’s aggravating.

As for the book: There are two different groupings of shape-shifters. One group inherits, and can pass on, the ability to transform; the other has to get bitten, first. The first group, the Pures, tend to be more powerful and they are in a role somewhat resembling that of aristocracy. The second group, the lycans, tend to be less controlled and are generally more likely to prey upon humans.

There is a question debated among Pures: when shall we reveal ourselves to the world at large, if ever?  And there is also a faction that wants to reveal themselves so that they may finally exert control over the mundanes, or exterminate them.

While appearing to work within the system of government of the Pures, the Conclave, there is a rogue element that seeks covert control, and it really seems to amount for a desire for personal power more than a desire to influence policy. At least, their actions seem to be of the ‘burn it all down’ nature.

Now, it’s one thing to write about secret operatives exposing plans to bring down civilization by introducing an Ebola variant into spray containers at trade shows across the USA. As it happens, I’ve read and enjoyed those stories as well; at least, I’ve enjoyed the stories where the good guys win and the bad guys lose.

It’s another thing entirely to present the tragedy in such a way that we can feel and empathize with the loss experienced by the hero. And that’s what sets apart this book; Mac, and others, had a deep relationship of trust and loyalty to the group of officers who were killed in an ambush, and yet, they MUST shut up, suit up, and show up if there is to be any justice done.

It’s really very well executed.

It does not bring the dead back to life. That loss must somehow be endured, which is precisely the treatment that makes the fantastic tale of shape-shifters something that we can relate to. Without kryptonite, we cannot care for Superman, because he is untouchable. It’s the weakness of the heroes, not their strengths, that makes them real and allows us to care for them.

And Amanda S Green does it AT LEAST as well as anyone in the field.

Get the book; you won’t regret it!

Awesome Review

I rarely link to or post  a review from Amazon but I couldn’t pass up this one. Pat Patterson is one of those reviewers who always tells it like it is. He also, when the mood strikes, can give you a review that is so full of humor and snark that you smile even as you wait for the shoe to drop. Needless to say, I always look forward to him reviewing my work and hold my breath until I see what he thinks. That’s especially true with Dagger of Elanna (Sword of the Gods Book 2).

So, you can imagine my excitement this morning when I saw this comment in one of the Facebook groups we’re both in.

“I have to make this note, and then GO TO BED! “Dagger of Elanna” by Amanda S. Green is so richly written, its a feast. GREAT things are afoot!”

I hoped that meant he would like the rest of the book but, paranoid writer that I am, I still held my breath until I saw his review go live on Amazon.

I  obtained this book through the Kindle Unlimited program.

I was hooked from the first scene. Actually, I suppose I was hooked BEFORE the first scene, since I read the first book in the series, ‘Sword of Arelion,” and loved it. But here’s what hooked me:

The book opens in a winter-soaked woodland. Through the biting cold and snow trudges a poor, pathetic man, who wonders if he will be able to reach a place where he can get warm before he freezes to death. He worries about his horse.

A sympathetic character, right?

WRONG!! He’s an evil murderous creator of monsters, sent on a mission to spy and assassinate. He’s NOT a nice guy!

Well, he has a family, and he’s afraid for them as well, but still: it’s a great curve ball. I was all set up to be sad at the poor dude, and was somewhat shocked to find such a soft intro brought me face to face with such a bad guy.

NICELY DONE!

More than what it tells us of this particular person is what it tells us about the nature of the deep, secret Bad Guy: he is inclined to use blackmail and threats to loved ones to motivate people he finds in his grasp.

On the other hand, we have Cait. She is the actual hero, no fooling, of the book: a paladin of sorts, with the divine marks of power and favor on her. She has been made third in command of the Order, based on the clear approval of the Lord and Lady, who are the ethereal Good Guys.

At the end of the last book, Cait was still without memory of her origins. Her first recollection was waking up in a slaver’s tent. However, she gets it all back in this episode. Not going to reveal what it is that she learns about herself, because I don’t want to spoil things.

In one well-written scene after another, bad guys get vanquished; people of weak-will get to find their courage; assassins of various good guys are foiled, and good people discover the eternal truth that if you do well, your reward is a tougher job.

The book is HUGE; 591 pages, I think. It drags not at all, though. It has a great storyline, and the characters have enough depth to make them real.

Reviews like this are part of why I write. I love knowing I’ve taken a reader on a journey he enjoyed. So, Pat, thanks so much for the awesome review.

You can find Pat’s blog here.

 

 

Writing and editing and reviews, oh my!

I am head down, butt in chair busily working on the final edits for Honor from Ashes (Honor and Duty Book 3). As I’ve noted before, I had planned for this third book to be the end of not necessarily the series but this story arc. Of course, with my muse being evil, the plan changed and there will be one more book in this particular arc. What happens after that waits to be seen.

This is part of the joy and frustration in being a writer. Sometimes a story takes a turn you don’t expect, no matter how carefully you plot it out beforehand. I know plotters who will come to a complete standstill with a project when that happens. Me, I’m a hybrid between a plotter and pantser. I know the end point of the story and I know the main story points that need to happen between the start and the end. What I don’t always know is what comes between them — or when the plot will diverge for a bit before coming back to the main road. It can be a fun and frustrating ride, especially when a carefully planned series suddenly adds a book or two to it.

As I work on the edits, I am also making notes for Dagger of Elanna, the follow up to Sword of Arelion (Sword of the Gods Book 1). I am also working on finishing Skeletons in the Closet — and deciding if I will publish it as a single volume or as two or three smaller volumes. This weekend, I will be finalizing the print editions for the three books I’ve fallen behind on. In other words, I’ll be doing the business end of writing, the end I know I am the weakest at. That includes not only getting the print versions out but dealing with promotions, the accounts, etc.

I have also, as you can tell by the more frequent posts here, decided to use blogging as my morning writing prompt. I haven’t quite made it habit to do a new post every day but I’m getting there. The reality is, between my posts here, on Mad Genius Club and According to Hoyt, I am doing close to 10k words of blogging a week. So far it hasn’t cut into my writing and has, in fact, seemed to spark it. Maybe it is because it has gotten me back into a “work day” mentality. Perhaps it is because the blogs are my morning prompt and get the creative juices flowing. I’m not sure and I am keeping track. The moment I feel they start cutting in on my “real” writing, I will see what needs to be cut back.

Now, reviews. I don’t often read them. However, there are a couple of reviewers I always read when I get notice they have commented on my work. Sure, I go in cringing because I am always afraid they won’t like my baby. It’s foolish because both are ethical and believe in talking with an author before posting a negative review. I appreciate it and am relieved that neither have felt the needs to have such a conversation with me — yet.

The first of those reviewers, Cedar Sanderson, I linked to earlier this week when I reblogged her review of Slay Bells Ring. The second reviewer is Pat Patterson. Pat is one of those reviewers you want to get to know on a personal level. His reviews are honest and, as I learned in the first one he did for one of my books, laced with humor. He is a blogger as well as a reviewer and his blog always leaves me smiling or thinking or both. Most of all, I love the way he talks about his wife. He calls her his “gift-from-God, happily-ever-after trophy wife Vanessa, the elegant, foxy, praying black grandmother”. It is clear from every word he writes about her that he adores her. He has to. He read my paranormal books to her. Not many men would do that.  😉

Anyway, Pat’s review of Slay Bells Ring went live on Amazon yesterday. I don’t know if he will be adding it to his blog or not. I’m just thrilled to have it on the Amazon page. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. (I am leaving in the link to Pat’s Amazon page so you can check out the rest of his reviews there. I also highly recommend you check out his blog, linked above.)

I want a series! Make it happen!, February 25, 2016
This review is from: Slay Bells Ring (Kindle Edition)
SLAY BELLS RING

Ferguson, Ellie; Green, Amanda S. (2016-01-14). Hunter’s Moon Press. Kindle Edition.

This is not a Christmas book!

I don’t care what you see on the cover, and I don’t care that the title is a goofy pun (and by goofy, I mean stupid). It’s not a Christmas book.

Now, Christmas does figure in to a wee, small, tiny, minuscule degree, in that it does establish a deadline for the protagonist to solve the murders before everyone’s schedule gets mixed up, but that’s it. It’s not a Christmas book.

Wait! I forgot one thing: it does provide an opportunity for bonding and healing through charming invitations to Christmas events. But that’s it, and I mean it this time. NOT A CHRISTMAS BOOK!

It’s a good, dare I say great book, though. I was drooling over it from the beginning, and that’s even before I got to the cuddly scene. (it’s a really nice cuddly scene, too. Just enough; not too much. Tasteful.)

Annie works for the district attorney in Austin, Texas, and is building a nice career, when she is called back home to Mossy Creek by her grandmother. It seems her aggravating and irritating mother has been arrested for murder; in fact, the police discover her clad only in her nightgown, standing over the body of the decedent, holding the murder weapon. And although no one who knows her mother would ever believe that she would commit such a tremendous social faux pas, no one would have believed that she would have been shacking up with an odious character like Spud Buchanan in the first place.

It is now time for me to pay homage to an author skilled in her craft. We know from the very beginning that Annie is a highly competent lawyer, and that the main reason that she had to leave for Austin was to get away from her mother. I had every expectation of reading chapters filled with the details of conflict between mother and daughter.

It doesn’t happen. Not once. The story unfolds seamlessly, we are introduced to characters from Annie’s past, as well as people she is meeting for the first time; we understand clearly where everyone stands on the issues; and we never hear one single word of vicious, nasty, catty, ugly infighting. Not only does this, in retrospect, seem like a refreshing brain cleanse, it also paves the way for realistic scene of reconciliation.

I really like Annie’s character. She is smart, highly skilled, tough when she needs to be, and she gratefully accepts the help that is offered her, even though it is often unexpected. Now, Mossy Creek is a pretty sedate town, so she may not have a lot of adventures ahead of her; on the other hand, Jessica Fletcher never seemed to suffer for mayhem in Cabot’s Cove.

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