Nocturnal Lives

Musings from the mind of Amanda S. Green – Mother, Writer, Possessed by Cats

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A Wonderful Nocturnal Rebellion Review

(Like so many of you, I’m still processing what happened in Las Vegas last night. Once I have, and once I know more facts, I’ll probably blog about it. In the meantime, I have to share this wonderful review of Nocturnal Rebellion. The reviewer is Pat Patterson and you can find his blog here.)

Nocturnal Rebellion, by Amanda S Green

For those of you who come here in order to read my latest philosophical or theological struggles,  I warn in advance: this is a book review about a police detective who is also a reserve Marine officer who can shape-shift into a jaguar. Don’t anticipate passion and depth, beyond that found in story dealing with the line-of-duty loss of fellow police officers.

This book was released on August 15, 2017, and with great anticipation, I obtained my copy through the Kindle Unlimited program on August 17. I hear you mutter, ‘but this is OCTOBER 2! What happened?’

Well what happened was a trip to the hospital for a small bowel obstruction, which resolved well. That was followed by multiple trips to the dentist, for major dental surgery, and a few major family health issues, and, well, just LOTS of things. My output of reviews and blog posts suffered. It’s aggravating.

As for the book: There are two different groupings of shape-shifters. One group inherits, and can pass on, the ability to transform; the other has to get bitten, first. The first group, the Pures, tend to be more powerful and they are in a role somewhat resembling that of aristocracy. The second group, the lycans, tend to be less controlled and are generally more likely to prey upon humans.

There is a question debated among Pures: when shall we reveal ourselves to the world at large, if ever?  And there is also a faction that wants to reveal themselves so that they may finally exert control over the mundanes, or exterminate them.

While appearing to work within the system of government of the Pures, the Conclave, there is a rogue element that seeks covert control, and it really seems to amount for a desire for personal power more than a desire to influence policy. At least, their actions seem to be of the ‘burn it all down’ nature.

Now, it’s one thing to write about secret operatives exposing plans to bring down civilization by introducing an Ebola variant into spray containers at trade shows across the USA. As it happens, I’ve read and enjoyed those stories as well; at least, I’ve enjoyed the stories where the good guys win and the bad guys lose.

It’s another thing entirely to present the tragedy in such a way that we can feel and empathize with the loss experienced by the hero. And that’s what sets apart this book; Mac, and others, had a deep relationship of trust and loyalty to the group of officers who were killed in an ambush, and yet, they MUST shut up, suit up, and show up if there is to be any justice done.

It’s really very well executed.

It does not bring the dead back to life. That loss must somehow be endured, which is precisely the treatment that makes the fantastic tale of shape-shifters something that we can relate to. Without kryptonite, we cannot care for Superman, because he is untouchable. It’s the weakness of the heroes, not their strengths, that makes them real and allows us to care for them.

And Amanda S Green does it AT LEAST as well as anyone in the field.

Get the book; you won’t regret it!

Vengeance from Ashes (expanded edition) – Snippet 2

(This is the second excerpt from the expanded edition of Vengeance from Ashes, release date scheduled for October 17th. The below excerpt is from the beta readers’ version and the published version may contain minor changes.)

***

Major Rico Santiago stared at the image on his screen. He couldn’t believe it. There was no way she could be on-planet, much less be just three floors below his office. But, as the ancient adage went, a picture was worth a thousand words. In this case, it was worth a hell of a lot much more and it raised just as many questions.

He leaned back and shook his head. Even after watching the scene in the cell for approximately five minutes, his mind refused to accept what his eyes saw. The prisoner, dressed in the standard issue black jumpsuit that the JAG euphemistically called “persons of interest”, was moving through an increasingly more difficult set of push-ups. First had been five standard push-ups. Then five knuckle push-ups followed by five fingertip push-ups. He’d continued to watch, even after catching the line of her jaw and the tilt of her head. That had been enough to confirm her identity. Even so, he still wondered if it wasn’t all a dream. No other explanation made sense.

His fingers moved over the virtual keyboard as he typed in a series of commands. He paged through the readouts, moving them into order, his eyes quickly scanning the results. Then he leaned back and blew out a breath. There was no doubt about it. Not only was she on-planet but someone had managed to get her there and into the security complex without him getting wind of it.

And that most definitely was not good.

As one of FleetCom’s top intelligence officers, it was his job to know everything before it happened. The fact this had almost slipped by him spoke volumes about who had issued the orders to bring her back to New Kilrain. He had no doubt those orders had come from well above his pay grade. No one else had the pull to not only send a ship for the woman but to get her released to local confinement. Who and why he didn’t know – but he would.

Frowning, he drummed his fingers against the synth-wood of his desktop. Could it be there were others besides himself looking into the circumstances surrounding Ashlyn Shaw’s court-martial and conviction? If so, what was their motivation and why had they brought her back? More important in some ways, who were they and why had they acted on their own instead of through his office?

He hated not having the answers. Any intelligence officer would. Unanswered questions could easily mean death, if not for the “spook” then for others, usually innocents.

Damn it, what the hell was going on?

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Review: Dishonored – Death of the Outsider

Dishonored: Death of the Outsider is an add-on game, for lack of a better term, to the Dishonored franchise. More than DLC and less than a full game, it is still an excellent addition to the Dishonored family.

Death of the Outsider takes place several months after the conclusion of Dishonored 2. Because it can be viewed as a standalone, it doesn’t require you to have played either of the previous games. Nor do you need a game save to cue certain events/background for the game. It assumes certain things happened in Dishonored 2 and you go from there.

Unlike the first two games where you played as Corvo (or possibly as Emily in D2), your playable character in Death of the Outsider is Billie Lurk (Meaghan from D2). Also returning as an NPC is Daud. The events of the first two games have sent Billie on a mission, not necessarily of redemption but of finding closure. Part of that means finding Daud, whom she betrayed earlier, and making peace (or something). Once she does find him, he gives her one last mission — to kill the “black eyed bastard” he holds responsible for all the bad that’s happened: the Outsider.

Gameplay in Death of the Outsider is different in some ways from the previous two games. Billie isn’t given the Outsider’s mark. That means she doesn’t have any of the powers we’re familiar with from playing as Corvo or Emily. Billie can listen to the rats, which allows you to gather information that might help in the completion of missions. Her “displace” power is similar to “blink”. Her final power is “foresight” which stops time for a moment and allows her to check the surrounding area. It’s a bit more complicated than that but you get the general idea. She also gets later in the game Void Strike. That’s it. You have basically the same “arrows” or “darts” as well as a variation on the pistol.

The one real change from the previous games is you no longer have to look for elixirs to replenish your mana. Use a power and wait for the mana to recharge. That can change your gameplay some. Something else that’s changed is there is no longer a chaos system in play. So you can go charging through, killing everyone in sight or take a more stealthy approach without fear of how it will impact the overall game. The game feels more open than the previous games and you will recognize some of the settings. The final change is that you have bounty missions you can take on to earn more money.

As with Dishonored 2, there is replay value with the game because of the Game + mode. Death of the Outsider’s game + mode lets you play with several of the powers from D2. What is different, however, is you don’t get to stack these powers with the powers from the original play through. Instead, they substitute for the powers you just played with. It does let you change your playing style and your strategy.

I hope this isn’t the final title in the Dishonored universe. It is, however, an excellent end to the current story arc. If you enjoy stealth games or if you like causing havoc by running and stabbing and being a general bad ass, I recommend you give Dishonored: Death of the Outsider a try. You don’t have to have played the first two games but doing so will make a lot of the plot more understandable.

Dishonored: Death of the Outsider is published by Bethesda Games and is available on PC, PS4 and Xbox One.

Reading and Writing: Can they co-exist?

Yesterday, I blogged about some of the books I’m either currently reading or have recently finished. As I wrote the post, I recalled some conversations I’ve had with other writers, not to mention online comments I’ve read, about their own reading habits. Then, this morning, I came across another post where a writer lamented the fact they can’t read fiction while writing. And a post was born.

Before I go any further, I want to address one of the misconceptions I’ve seen new writers express on more than one occasion. These writers have said they don’t read while writing because their product is so “unique”, they don’t want to dilute it by exposing it to other people’s work. Uh, nope. If it is that unique, reading how other people write will only enforce that uniqueness. Of course, reading other people’s work might also point out that your “uniqueness” might not be as unique as you think.

Now, if you are afraid you’ll start imitating the style of the writer you’re reading, or copying plots or plot devices, that’s something else. And there is an easy fix for it. Just don’t read in your genre, at least not while you are writing. After you finish your project, then go back to the genre and read. Why? Because you need to see what’s selling. You need to read it to figure out why it’s selling. You need to read it study story structure, the tropes being used (and not being used), character development, etc. After all, if you don’t read a genre, how can you successfully write in it?

I also read to make sure I’m not writing something that has basically already been done to death. For example, when it comes to urban fantasy, I do shifters. But I try to add a different twist to them. I don’t do vampires. For one, they’ve never really hit me as romantic figures — and let’s face is. Most of the UF featuring them have them as romantic figures. There are some exceptions but not all that many and if we look at paranormal romance . . . — I don’t know if I will ever write vampires. The very thought of doing so and I hear my friend Kate, her Aussie accent full of humor, as she wonders how a vamp can “get it up” since there’s no blood flow. Then she goes on to speculate on what sort of sex toys would be needed. Nope, I so do not need to go there.  😉

It’s a bit harder with romantic suspense to find a new twist. That’s where you have to make sure your characters are different. It has to do with craft and that leads back to reading. One of the best ways to not only see where you need to improve your craft but to see examples of what to do and what not to do is to read in your genre.

An example of this came across my timeline the other day. There’s a book that shall not be named (for fear someone might foolishly go to Amazon and buy it) that is not only an example of all the things you shouldn’t do as an author (from poor cover design to poor story structure, character development and so much more) or say as an author (this guy takes the award for how not to respond to criticism). The book in question has become part of my examples of what not to do when I talk with new writers. It is truly an example of why so many people hesitate to buy an indie novel.

Fortunately, it was the only novel out there of its kind. Or so I thought. And yes, there is a specific theme to the book that breaks my suspension of belief meter. Except, as my timeline proved the other day, it’s not. Someone else has written a book using basically the same theme. Worse, reading the blurb, it is written pretty much as badly as the first book. Different author. Same theme and many of the same issues. A little bit of research could have helped this author, as would reading the original book (gag) to learn where that author had gone wrong.

I guess this is all saying read. You might not be able to read your genre while writing and I get that. But read your genre after you finish a project. That’s my reward to myself. I still read though while writing. I read non-fiction and I read genres not related to my current work-in-progress. I’m not sure I could go an entire project without reading.

Now I’d best get to work. Until later.

And now, for something different

I’ve been on a quasi-political bent of late. Part of that is because my muse has been, well, my muse. She’s evil and she loves to torment me. Part of it is because there are times when you just have to speak your mind. Today, however, I want to do something I haven’t done in a bit. I want to talk about some of the books I’ve been reading.

Any of you who have been following this blog, or my posts over at Mad Genius Club, know I’ve been an avid reader forever. I have my parents to thank (or curse, when I look at my bank account) for that. Some of my earliest memories are of them reading to me. There were always books in the house and they made sure I had my own library card as soon as I was old enough.

They also encouraged me to read beyond what school said I should. While my classmates in elementary school were reading chapter books and the like, I was reading books that came from the monthly book club my dad subscribed to or non-fiction books my parents checked out of the library. I can remember reading a science encyclopedia the baby sitter had. That was really fun because it discussed not only scientific theory and discoveries but what might be possible in the future.

That love of reading has stayed with me throughout my life. So, when I see a writer (usually a wanna-be writer) say they don’t read, I cringe. How can you be a writer and not read? You have to read to do some of your research. You must read to find out what the current market is looking for. You need to read to learn story structure and character development — both how to do it and how not to do it.

Anyway, here are a few of the books I’ve read or am currently reading.

One of my guilty pleasures when it comes to reading are the Bluegrass books (there are now several series) by Kathleen Brooks. These are quick reads with fun characters who love their family, friends, dogs and guns. The latest, Forever Concealed, is the 7th book in the current series.If you enjoy romance and suspense mixed with a healthy dose of humor, give Ms. Brooks a try. Each book stands on its own but I recommend starting at the beginning of each series. Heck, who am I kidding. I recommend you begin with the first book in the original series and go from there.

For non-fiction, and because we will be seeing the play based on the book in the near future, I’m currently reading The Most Reluctant Convert: C. S. Lewis’ Journey to Faith. This isn’t my usual sort of thing for my non-fiction reading. I tend more toward history, politics or military non-fiction. But last year we went to see the Screwtape Letters on stage with friends and it was such an excellent performance that, when we learned the same group was doing this on stage, we decided to go. Because there is a discussion period after the performance, I thought reading the book might be helpful.

This next book was on my to buy list but after the price was reduced because I refuse to pay more than $10 for a fiction e-book. However, a friend gave it to me (yay!). Another of my guilty pleasures are the Eve Dallas books by J. D. Robb. I’ll admit, she’s had some misses with this series, but that’s to be expected when there are as many books in the series as there are now. This last book, Silence in Death, while far from a miss didn’t hit the mark as solidly in my opinion as Brotherhood in Death or even Apprentice in Death. Part of that is because the victim in this case wasn’t someone I cared about. Part was because the killer also wasn’t anyone I cared about. But the story was still pretty solid and the favorite characters were there. So, I enjoyed it but it isn’t on the “to be reread very soon” pile.

One of my favorite series right now is the Jane Yellowrock series by Faith Hunter. A big reason for that is seeing how Jane has grown and changed over the course of the series. Of course, Jane’s snark doesn’t hurt either. Her latest, Cold Reign, brings us closer to the big and potentially final battle the books have been leading up to. But, this being Jane, she’s thrown a wrench in the works that changes the playing field in ways no one yet knows. I highly recommend this book for any fan of urban fantasy.

Finally, two books from one of my favorite authors, Larry Correia. The first, Monster Hunter Siege, is the latest in the series. As always, there are guns, monsters and explosions. What’s not to love? It also sets us up perfectly for what is to come next in the series. All I can say there is never, ever piss off a new mother who has access to more guns and things that go boom! than the military. It won’t end well for the bad guys. As for Siege itself, we get some answers about Owen’s past and a lot more questions about what’s to come. Larry, as always, hits it out of the park with this book.

The last book is available for pre-order with a release date of October 3rd. That’s Monster Hunter Files. This is an anthology set in the MHI universe. It includes stories by not only Larry but also Jim Butcher, John Ringo, Sarah A. Hoyt, Faith Hunter, Brad Torgersen and more. I can hardly wait. I am not usually a fan of anthologies but this one, from everything I’ve seen and heard, will be well worth the money.

Now I guess I’d best find another cup of coffee and get to work. Until later!

On B&N, Spenser Rapone and more

Just a quick post this morning. Yesterday, I blogged over at Mad Genius Club about the latest news coming out about Barnes & Noble. Today, I have a post up at Victory Girls about that poor excuse for an Army officer, Spenser Rapone. While completely different topics, they have one thing in common: they are perfect examples of someone doing whatever the hell they want without worrying about the consequences.

In B&N’s case, the blame falls on Leonard Riggio and the rest of the company’s board. They continue to refuse to admit the world has moved on beyond just the print book. The company waited too long to get into the digital side of the business. It failed to invest the money necessary to develop and maintain the tech side or, even worse, a website that is easily navigable. It lost its identity as a bricks and mortar book store by decreasing the number of books available in favor of non-book related items. Now, after too many losing quarters, it announced it is abandoning the tech side (sorry Nook users) and focusing on the stores. Riiiight. They have been promising to listen to customers and focus on stores for ages and it hasn’t helped. When is the board going to finally realize they have to move forward and be responsive to what their customers want instead of focusing on what worked 20 years ago?

As for Rapone, well, my post at Victory Girls says it all. I’m a proud military mom. I wouldn’t want my son serving anywhere near him. Why? Because someone who doesn’t value the basic tenets of this country, who violates his oaths, can’t be trusted to watch the backs of his squad mates. How he managed to get through West Point is beyond me.

Finally, work progresses on Light Magic. I’m trying to decide how often to post snippets. Now it’s time for me to get back to work. Let me hear your thoughts on both B&N and Rapone. Now go have a great day!

Light Magic — Snippet #1

(The opening of the novel, as well as some of the main character’s backstory, has changed. Myrtle, being the evil muse that she is, might demand further changes before publication. But here is the opening scene. This is from the rough draft. Hope you enjoy!)

***

If anything happens to me, go home to Mossy Creek. I mean it, Meggie. Go there and find Serena Duchamp. She’ll know what to do. Promise me, Meggie. Please. Do this for me and for you.

I first read those words two weeks ago when my mother’s attorney handed me a file of paperwork. Mr. Chandler’s expression was appropriately serious. There might have been a hint of compassion in his rheumy blue eyes but I hadn’t noticed. All I’d wanted was to get out of there. I’d had more than my share of people offering their hollow condolences and well-wishes over the last few days. They no more fooled me than they had my mother.

Damn them. If they cared so much, why hadn’t they been there for her when she’d needed them?

Why hadn’t I?

The latter was easier to answer than the former. I hadn’t been there because she didn’t tell me she was sick. I would have gone AWOL if necessary to get to her in time. Not that it would have been necessary. I hadn’t been active duty in almost seven years. I wasn’t even a member of the Reserves any longer. Much as I’d hated giving it up, it had been the Reserves or my job and I needed my job. It allowed me to not only keep a roof over my head but to help supplement Mom’s expenses as well. I should have realized something was wrong when she quit protesting the money I sent at the beginning of each month. I thought she’d quit because she knew I would keep sending it, whether she wanted me to or not. It was my way of repaying her for all the sacrifices she’d made for me when I was younger.

Damn it, I should have listened to the doubts and asked her straight out what was going on. Now it was too late. She was gone, leaving me with more questions than I had answers, not the least of which was why she wanted me to go “back” to some hole-in-the-wall town in Texas named Mossy Creek. The only problem was I didn’t remember ever being in Mossy Creek. So how could I go back to it?

If that wasn’t enough, who was this Serena Duchamp and what was she supposed to help me?

Instead of Mom telling me she was sick, I’d been blindsided by a call from her minister. I’d listened in disbelief as he told me Mom “was no longer with us.” Yep, that’s exactly how he put it and it took me several moments to realize what he meant. I’m sure he thought I must have been in denial when I asked why he was calling to tell me she’d changed churches. It never occurred to me that she might actually be dead. My mother had always been bigger than life, even if she stood just under five-feet tall. She had been a force of nature. She had to be to survive in Maxon’s Mill, Kansas. Despite having lived there since I was a toddler, Mom had been an outsider. Oh, those living there had no problems coming to her when they needed something, but they never accepted her – or me.

Now they could all rot in Hell as far as I was concerned. To prove it, once old man Chandler filed the probate papers, I packed up my mother’s things, sold what furniture I didn’t want and put everything else into storage in Wichita. I didn’t trust the locals enough to leave it there. Her house was on the market, the attorney taking care of the legalities. And I had no reason to ever return to the town that had never made us feel welcome.

Instead, I was on my way to a town I’d never heard of until opening Mom’s last letter to me, one she’d known wouldn’t be delivered until after her death. But what did it mean?

And why had she never mentioned Mossy Creek or this Serena Duchamp before if they were so important?

Free Speech, the NFL and More

I hadn’t planned on writing this post. After all, you can’t turn on the news this morning without seeing what happened at the beginning of the NFL games yesterday. The story isn’t over, either, because there is another game tonight. But comments by Pittsburg Steelers coach Mike Tomlin force my hand. His attitude, combined with the events — or non-events — at UC Berkley over the weekend, are indicative of a problem in this country that the media refuses to cover. Very simply put, free speech is approved only so long as you are doing or saying what the “cool kids” approve of. In this case, the cool kids are the media, Antifa and the like.

We saw a perfect example of someone doing what he felt was right yesterday. Steelers player Alejandro Villanueva came out of the tunnel and stood, hand over his heart, during the playing of the National Anthem. He was the lone Steeler to take to the field. Villanueva, a former Army Ranger, had the courage to stand in respect and in support of the flag he served and the country he loves. None of his other teammates can say the same.

Not that they had the choice. Coach Tomlin made the call they wouldn’t take the field until after the Anthem was played. Here’s what Tomlin (who, along with several of his coaches, did take to the field and stand for the Anthem) had to say:

We’re chasing something special here in 2017 and we’re not going to play politics. We’re football players. We’re football coaches. We’re not participating in the anthem today. Not to be disrespectful to the anthem, but to remove ourselves from the circumstance.

People shouldn’t have to choose. If a guy wants to go about his normal business and participate in the anthem, he shouldn’t have to be forced to choose sides. If a guy feels the need to do something, he shouldn’t be separated from his teammate who chooses not to. So we’re not participating today. That’s our decision. We’re going to be 100 percent. We came here to play a football game. That’s our intent.

Now, at first blush, this seems reasonable. However, look a little closer. He says they aren’t going to play politics but that’s exactly what they did. It was a political statement made in response to President Trump’s comments about firing those players who don’t stand for the playing of the Anthem. There’s no way they would have responded in the same way had it been anyone else to say what Trump did. they might have given the reporters a soundbite but that would have been all. No, this was exactly what Tomlin claimed it wasn’t. It was a political statement. But there’s more.

He goes on to say people shouldn’t have to choose. But isn’t that exactly what he, and the rest of the coaching staff, did for the players? They chose to make a statement by staying inside the tunnel, a choice that was not unanimous. In fact, I have yet to find out how many of the players actually voted to remain off the field. Was this a case where the few made the decision for the many? Even if it was a majority, that took the decision away from those who, like Villanueva, wanted to pay respect to the flag and the anthem.

But there is another quote, even more telling, that came from Tomlin later.

When asked by a reporter about hero Alejandro Villanueva coming out of the locker room to stand for the national anthem, instead of staying inside like the rest of his teammates, coach Tomlin said, “Like I said, I was looking for 100 percent participation, we were gonna be respectful of our football team.”

That doesn’t sound like he’s willing to let his players make a decision, to make a choice. Will any of us be surprised to find he disciplined Villanueva for not standing down? If so, he will have simply proven the double-standard that is so evident right now when it comes to the topic of free speech. And no, I’m not talking about “freedom of speech” as guaranteed in the Constitution. I’m talking about the ability to say what we want, as long as it doesn’t violate the law, without fear of reasonable reprisal.

Yes, an employee has to consider how what he says or does reflects on his employer. If he does something that reflects negatively on his employer or that could negatively impact the brand, it is reasonable that he will face reprisal from the employer. However, the key is “negatively impact”. Standing for the National Anthem will not reach that threshold. Now, it is debatable if kneeling for it will. Considering the decline in rating for NFL games, it can be argued that it does. However, that is for the bean counters to decide.

What is so troubling about what happened Sunday is that there were those who wanted to show their respect for the flag, for the anthem and for this country and were not allowed to do so by their coaches. How dare they! If you say in one breath that the NFL isn’t going to play politics and then, with the very next, do something like that, you are worse than those you condemn.

Like it or not, those players who choose to take a knee can do so. I don’t have to like it but I won’t attempt to stop it. I will simply make my feelings known in ways that can impact their bottom line. I won’t buy their jerseys. I won’t go to games they play in. However, when management inserts itself into the equation and claim politics isn’t involved, I will call bullshit. I will turn off the TV when their team is on. I won’t buy from the businesses advertising with them. Since I have no doubt Roger Goodell, head of the NFL, will do anything about the situation, I have no qualms about tuning out. I will also recommend the Pentagon and other governmental agencies withdraw any financial support, through ads etc., from the NFL as well. After all, why should the NFL benefit financially when it won’t take a stance to allow all its players to have a voice in this issue?

If Tomlin wants an all or nothing proposition, I’m more than happy to give it to him.

Cover Reveal

Here it is. I’m so excited!

And, as noted yesterday, the release date for the expanded, special edition is October 17th.

Release Date Set

With the final touches being put on the new cover for the expanded version of Vengeance from Ashes, the release date has been set. I’m excited about it and, in a lot of ways, terrified. I loved the book as it originally appeared but I think this new version is a stronger book. It will be released as an e-book and, very shortly after that (on that day if all goes according to plan), in paper. I’m hoping to have an audio version available shortly as well.

In case you missed it yesterday when I posted the revised first chapter of the book, the expanded edition adds approximately 20,000 words to the story. There are some new chapters as well as several new scenes.

So, when is the release date?

October 17th. Mark your calendars.

What’s going to happen is I will take the original version down from after October 10th. For those of you who have already bought it, it will still be in your library (or so Amazon has assured me. But you might want to make a backup copy. You should anyway on all your books.) On the 17th, the expanded version will go on sale. The description, as well as the new cover, will make it clear that this is a special expanded edition and that it includes new material.

Around that same time, the original version of the book will be released in the other stores. I’m not yet ready to give up on KU but I do want to see if I can get any play in the other stores. In the past, when I’ve released books across the board, I didn’t make enough sales from the other bookstore sites to make up for the lack of KU downloads. This is a new way of seeing if that still holds true.

I’ll be posting the updated cover once I get it. In the meantime, please mark your calendars for the 17th and spread the word.

Until later!

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